List of 20 Square Competitors in Payments Solutions

-1Payment solutions are a commodity

Once a market is saturated with similar offerings and all the offerings start to look and sound alike, you pretty much have a commodity.

It doesn’t matter much if you choose option A or option B. They’re pretty much the same.

Market differentiation is pretty low.

Why?

  • They copied each other
  • They don’t integrate big picture business strategy with big picture user experience strategy
  • They stopped at feature-level, functional user experience – (no longer good enough)

Feature-level and even product-level user experience is no longer good enough in hyper-competitive, saturated markets — You have to think bigger. You have to leverage design strategically.

A list of Square’s competitors

Apple Payapple.com/apple-pay

Android Payplay.google.com/store/apps

Paypalpaypal.com

Google Walletgoogle.com/wallet

Mobile Pay (Bank of America) – play.google.com/store/apps

Samsung Paysamsung.com/us/samsung-pay

Mobile Money (T-Mobile) – play.google.com/store/apps

LG Pay – Website unknown

Sagesage.com

CoincoinPayment.com

Dwolladwolla.com

Braintreebraintreepayments.com

Cardfreecardfree.com

Cellumcellum.com

infobitinfobip.com

Fiservfiserv.com

tPaytionetworks.com

Fortunofortumo.com

Mokimoki.com

FIS (mFoundry)fisglobal.com

Intuit GoPaymentpayments.intuit.com

mobiquity wallet – (Mahindra Comviva) – mahindracomviva.com

Aurigaaurigaspa.com

Want to see even more?

Mobile Payments Todaymobilepaymentstoday.com

Google Play – App Storeplay.google.com/store

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Dan Montano: User Experience and Product Manager. Designs great user experiences. Follow me on Twitter: @DanielMontano and send me an invite on Linkedin: Linkedin.com/in/danielmontanoEmail: Dan@DanMontano.com | Get in touch.


Have a quick question? Ask away!

Emergency Hashtag Guidelines

We can use social media to inform and help each other during emergencies and disasters, (assuming wireless communications are available).

Unfortunately, hashtags on social media can become noisy, confusing and can lead to disinformation that may actually make matters worse.

It doesn’t have to be that way.

We can leverage information architecture to help us organize our communications.

Emergency hashtag guidelines

If no hashtag exists, create a hashtag with a short name for the event #(eventName).

After creating a hashtag or a hashtag emerges #(eventName), assume that the generic hashtag will be used for political statements, opinions and other noisy gibberish — open new communication channels by creating additional hashtags:

#(eventName)411 – For general official, trusted information from emergency units (fire, police, SWAT, etc).

#(eventName)911 – For individuals seeking help. Example: “#(eventName)911 – Trapped in the basement. North East side.”

#(eventName)UOK? – For families trying to find out if a loved one is OK – which may include posting of photos for others in the area to help find the individual.

How are services affected?

The simplest way to inform people about the status of services would be to add a services tag to the event hashtag:

#(eventName)Services – This may include information about highways, water, electricity, gas, etc.

If this single tag turns out to be noisy. We could move to more specific tags:

#(eventName)HWY – Information for highways and roads. Example: “#(eventName)HWY Avoid 10FWY West between La Brea and National. @CHP (Radio station /Link to website for more)

#(eventName)Metro – Information from subway, underground, metro rail transportation.  Example: “#(eventName)Metro – Avoid Wilshire/Western Red Line station. Use Santa Monica or MacArthur. @LAmetro (Radio station /Link to website for more)”

#(eventName)Utilities – Information from water, power, gas. Example: “#(eventName)Utilities – Gas lines and tap water has been suspended until further notice.” @LAWP (Radio station /Link to website for more)”

Volunteers

In every event, there are people and organizations that care enough to volunteer to help others. A hashtag to organize volunteers would be helpful:

#(eventName)Volunteers – Example: #(eventName)Volunteers: “Car flipped. We need help moving the car. Corner of  Wilshire/Western.

#(eventName)Volunteers – Example: #(eventName)Volunteers – “Red Cross, La Brea and Santa Monica Blvd. has water.” @RedCross

#(eventName)Volunteers – Example: #(eventName)Volunteers – “StoreName at La Brea and Santa Monica Blvd. Is offering to recharge phones and devices for free.” @StoreName

The objectives

  • To inform a large number of people quickly
  • To guide people to more reliable channels of information such as websites, radio stations and phone lines
  • To encourage the emergence of networks of individuals and organizations that can help each other

Share these ideas with…

  • Your loved ones
  • Your local government agencies
  • People that are able to help inform your community (community leaders, school leaders, teachers, religious leaders, counselors, social workers, etc.)

Feel free to improve on these ideas. If you’re an app creator, consider creating an app that can help in one way or another.

We can have a system in place to ensure better communication during emergencies. Don’t wait until there’s an emergency to do this.

Dig the well, long before you’re thirsty.

Are You Hiring? New Job Board for UX, Digital Marketing, Product Management

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If you are hiring

If you are hiring UX staff, digital marketing staff, product managers, or related positions, please consider posting an ad on my Jobs board.

Just look on the right column of my blog, under “Jobs” and click on the link: “Post a job…” or send me an email message: info@DanMontano.com

If you’re looking for work

Send me your resume. Make sure to include:

Customer Retention Depends on Your Onboarding Experience

user's onboarding experience

How do you define the onboarding experience?

Ask yourself these and other questions to help you define what the onboarding experience is.

  • Where does the onboarding experience begin? Where does it end?
  • How do you know if you’re supporting a good onboarding experience, or not?
  • Which metrics are you using to track the onboarding experience? Are these the right ones?
  • Which strategies and tactics are you using to address each of the onboarding challenges?

Your definition of the onboarding experience will guide the strategies and tactics you use to address customer retention problems.

Customer retention relies on the onboarding experience

It’s critical for customer retention that your customers quickly understand how to leverage your product to meet their goals and objectives.

Your user’s first experiences with your product matter. These first experiences can help the users get significant value, such as:

  • Recognize the value of your brand
  • Let the users validate advertising and marketing promises
  • Give the users an overview of how to leverage the product to meet goals
  • Provide an overview of how the features help the users complete tasks
  • Set (realistic) expectations for the user
  • Give the users an opportunity to get started using the product
  • Support the user to complete tasks and objectives successfully

When does the onboarding experience begin?

Psychology taught us that our brains have a hard time telling the difference between something we visualized vividly and something that happened in real life.

If this is true, then the user’s experience with your product begins earlier than we previously imagined. The first user experiences may include:

On the wider perspective, it includes the onboarding experience — however you choose to define it. Your definition of it will be part of the “secret sauce” that makes up your USP.

Take action

Read my other blog posts on customer retention and the onboarding experience:

I will write a few more blog posts about customer retention. Subscribe to the mailing list to make sure you don’t miss them.

Don’t miss the next blog post!

I will write a few more blog posts about customer retention. Subscribe to the mailing list to make sure you don’t miss them.

Sign up below!




DMDan Montano: User Experience and Product Manager. Designs great user experiences. Follow me on Twitter: @DanielMontano and send me an invite on Linkedin: https://Linkedin.com/in/danielmontanoEmail: Dan@DanMontano.com | Get in touch.


Have a quick question? Ask away!

Are You Making Critical Mistakes in Your Free Trial Experience?

User experience of Free trial

Don’t do both: “fail fast”, without regard for the user’s experience and then cry over your customer retention rates — choose one.

The Free Trial experience is key

The Free Trial experience can make or break your product. It’s often the only change your users will have to evaluate your product. If that user experience goes wrong for most of your users — your product will fail — very fast.

The users who persist beyond a negative user experience in your Free Trial will be at risk of abandoning your product sooner, rather than later.

The question is how will you know they had a bad user experience with your Free Trial?

Having users be your “free user testing” and “free QA” is one of the reasons why your retention rate sucks.

Tracking Free Trial KPIs

Are you keeping track of your Free Trial experience data? Here are a few questions you should ask yourself. Hopefully these questions will get you thinking of metrics you could measure to get an idea of how well your Free Trial experience is working.

  • How many users enrolled in your free trial?
  • How often did the users visit the product during the free trial period?
  • How long did they stay?
  • Which tasks did they complete during their visits?
  • Did they start and abort any tasks during their free trial visits?
  • Did they get up and running successfully with your product?
  • Did they derive any functional value from their usage during the free trial?
  • How many of those users remained as active users after the free trial period?

There is a time and a place for everything. Free Trial usability is the wrong time and the wrong place to “fail fast”.

What to do after the failed Free Trial experience?

What are you doing about the users who had a bad user experience and dropped out?

Are you sending them email messages offering them a discount?

Think about it:
  • Why would they want a discount for a product that — as far as they have experienced — sucks?
  • Why would they want to pay anything for it?

If you’re offering discounts and other gimmicky offers — that’s bad.

If you’re not doing anything about the problem — that’s worse.

User experience monitoring is key

When you do something, matters. Once the user makes up their mind that your product sucks, that may be the point of no return. So, trying to romance users back to your product then may be, “too little, too late”.

In order to catch users before they fail — you need to monitor the KPI’s we covered above on a daily basis.

To be honest, if you’re catching problems this late in the game, this should be a wake-up call that you have user experience problems that should have been caught before — during prototype testing with users.

Ignoring the Free Trial experience is an expensive mistake

  • Expect bad reviews in app stores, social media and other publications
  • Don’t be surprised to find YouTube videos showing how bad your product is. (Some of these videos become viral content)
  • Persistent, negative search engine results = more expensive SEO and other marketing efforts
  • Marketing and selling to angry users is harder, takes longer and it’s more expensive
  • It takes time to overcome initial waves of negative user feedback. In business, time is lots of money
  • You’re gambling with people’s trust. This is a huge deal

Don’t miss the next blog post!

The Free Trial experience is part of the Onboarding experience. Read these other onboarding posts on this blog:

I will write a few more blog posts about customer retention. Subscribe to the mailing list to make sure you don’t miss them.

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DMDan Montano: User Experience and Product Manager. Designs great user experiences. Follow me on Twitter: @DanielMontano and send me an invite on Linkedin: https://Linkedin.com/in/danielmontanoEmail: Dan@DanMontano.com | Get in touch.


Have a quick question? Ask away!

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6 Ways To Improve Customer Retention

Improve Customer Retention

UX and customer retention

Customer retention is a compound problem. Many things can contribute to it. We will focus on those aspects that are related to UX and product design.

A lot of UX professionals get tunnel vision and get stuck in thinking of UX as a  functional process, that ends the moment an user is able to navigate through a product to complete a task successfully.

This is a very narrow notion of what user experience can bring to the table. It’s not a strategic way of applying UX resources to produce the value that can be produced.

These shortcomings, in value delivery, leave user needs unmet and affect your customer retention metrics.

Functional design is a good start, but not enough to design a lasting, good user experience

How UX can help

  1. Have UX design beyond functional objectives
  2. Treat user engagement as a feature in your products
  3. Help users experience the value they leverage with your products
  4. Help users overcome common obstacles and barriers
  5. Help users understand the product and its value at all levels
  6. Help users integrate your product with their workflows and other technologies in their ecosystem

Your context is different

Every industry and every business has a different context and so do your users. If you’d like to consider the specific customer attrition challenges you face and how different departments can collaborate to improve things, get in touch: info@DanMontano.com

Take action

Read the other blog posts on customer retention and the onboarding experience:

I will write a few more blog posts about customer retention. Subscribe to the mailing list to make sure you don’t miss them.

Don’t miss the next blog post!

I will write a few more blog posts about customer retention. Subscribe to the mailing list to make sure you don’t miss them.

Sign up below!




DMDan Montano: User Experience and Product Manager. Designs great user experiences. Follow me on Twitter: @DanielMontano and send me an invite on Linkedin: https://Linkedin.com/in/danielmontanoEmail: Dan@DanMontano.com | Get in touch.


Have a quick question? Ask away!

info@DanMontano.com

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